2021-2022 Brenau University Catalog 
    
    Oct 06, 2022  
2021-2022 Brenau University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses Descriptions


 

Healthy Lifestyle

  
  •  

    HL 101 - Drug Abuse/Alcoholism *

    (1)
    This course is designed to actually change behaviors, using education as the primary method for reducing drug/alcohol abuse. A reduction process will be presented to provide each individual with information designed to reduce problems caused by alcohol and drug abuse.
  
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    HL 102 - Exercise Science *

    (1)
    A scientific study of human movement. Analysis of locomotor and non-manipulative skills and physiological principles underlying human performance. Includes lecture and lab.
  
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    HL 103 - First Aid: Responding to Emergencies *

    (1)
  
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    HL 104 - Human Sexuality *

    (1)
    Current human sexuality issues will be presented in an academic setting emphasizing such pertinent topics as date rape, birth control, pregnancy and childbirth, abortion, and various sexually transmitted diseases.
  
  •  

    HL 105 - Self Defense *

    (1)
    The course will provide the student with the opportunity to learn self-defense, which focuses on building skills in four areas: awareness, precautions, assertiveness and physical techniques. This course will also allow students to examine, both on an individual and group level, barriers that prevent women from successfully defending themselves and ways to overcome them.
  
  •  

    HL 105W - Self Defense *

    (1)
    The course will provide the student with the opportunity to learn self-defense, which focuses on building skills in four areas: awareness, precautions, assertiveness and physical techniques. This course will also allow students to examine, both on an individual and group level, barriers that prevent women from successfully defending themselves and ways to overcome them. This course is designated as a “W” course. W courses emphasize the experience and expertise of women throughout course design and delivery. Students will identify and analyze the contributions and experiences of women. More than 50% of course activities, readings, and assessments emphasize and explore female experience, perspective, or expertise.
  
  •  

    HL 106 - Healthy Habits *

    (1)
    A flexible course of study investigating the major components of nutrition and physical fitness as they relate to overall good health.

Health Science

  
  •  

    HS 100 - Medical Professional Seminar

    (3)
    This course will address PA students’ goals as well as provide a brief history of the PA profession and the role of PA today. Hands-on learning of basic PA skills such as taking patient histories and cultural differences are included.
  
  •  

    HS 102 - Careers in the Helping Professions *

    (3)
    This course is designed to expose undergraduate students to the myriad of careers in the helping professions. Students will complete personal assessments providing information about personality type and interests, which will be related to career descriptions in the healing arts. Additionally, speakers representative of the breath of healthcare careers will be followed by shadowing experiences in at least two of the students chose careers of interest.
  
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    HS 102W - Careers in the Helping Professions *

    (3)
    This course is designed to expose undergraduate students to the myriad of careers in the helping professions. Students will complete personal assessments providing information about personality type and interests, which will be related to career descriptions in the healing arts. Additionally, speakers representative of the breath of health care careers will be followed by shadowing experiences in at least two of the students chose careers of interest.  This course is designated as a “W” course. W courses emphasize the experience and expertise of women throughout course design and delivery. Students will identify and analyze the contributions and experiences of women. More than 50% of course activities, readings, and assessments emphasize and explore female experience, perspective, or expertise.
  
  •  

    HS 103 - Introduction to the Nursing Profession

    (3)
    Course introduces the four metaparadigms in nursing: health, nursing, patient, and environment while integrating these concepts into professional learning activities. Basic human needs, adaptation theory, nursing process, and professional practice areas are introduced.
  
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    HS 105 - Healthy Lifestyle Habits *

    (3)
    This course is designed to enlighten students to the many facets of health and wellness. Various lifestyle factors will be explored in relation to their effect on the body, along with strategies for integrating healthier behaviors into day to day life.
  
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    HS 200 - Medical Terminology

    (1)
    Provides students with a basic understanding of medical terminology for communication with healthcare professionals and lay people. Focus is on terminology of body systems, root forms, prefixes, and suffixes, protocols, symptomatology, and medical abbreviations.
  
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    HS 201 - Clinical Medical Communications

    (3)
    This course provides students with an in-depth understanding of medical terminology in preparation for post-baccalaureate studies in Physician Assistant, Pharmacology, Physical Therapy, and Medical school. Focus is on techniques of medical word building, methods of categorizing major surgical, diagnostic, symptomatic, and grammatical position and direction, regions of the body, and additional combining forms related to diagnostic methods and pathology. The course is organized around specific body systems to include diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, symptomatic and pathology terms, to include pharmacology and medical record terms.
  
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    HS 205 - Science Writing and Research Skills

    (3)
    A science-writing course that will focus on writing and communication skills necessary in careers in biology and other science fields. There will be an emphasis on research, editing, peer review, and presentation skills. Prerequisite(s): EH 101, EH 102
  
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    HS 205W - Science Writing and Research Skills

    (3)
    A science-writing course that will focus on writing and communication skills necessary in careers in biology and other science fields.  There will be an emphasis on research, editing, perr review, and presentation skills. This course is designated as a “W” course. W courses emphasize the experience and expertise of women throughout course design and delivery. Students will identify and analyze the contributions and experiences of women. More than 50% of course activities, readings, and assessments emphasize and explore female experience, perspective, or expertise. Prerequisite(s): EH 101 & EH 102 (minimum grade of C)
  
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    HS 206 - Hematology

    (3)
    Study of the blood and blood-forming tissues with emphasis on the cellular morphology and hematopoietic mechanisms of the red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Also covers a wide variety of clinical disorders, particularly those involving abnormally formed cellular elements and coagulations. Prerequisite(s): BY 112, CY 122
  
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    HS 301 - Introduction to History taking and Physical Exam

    (4)
    This course will introduce the advanced learner to history taking and basic physical exam techniques. The emphasis of the course will be on the clinical application of H&P findings. Common Pathology will be introduced with a focus on patient assessment and care plan development through clinical case scenarios. The course will be group based learning as well as instructor oversight of clinical role playing within the context of the course. Prerequisite(s): HS 100
  
  •  

    HS 315 - Pathophysiology for the Health Professions

    (3)
    This course introduces the fundamentals of pathophysiology for the health professions. Focusing on essential concepts of disease processes, such as inflammation and healing, students will learn information on a broad-spectrum of diseases. This knowledge can then be applied in subsequent courses and clinical practice. Prerequisite(s): BY 210
  
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    HS 325 - Community Health

    (3)
    This course is an overview of community wellness programs. Students will be exposed to various health issues within community subgroups and the analysis of the interrelationship of the political, social, and economic dimensions of community wellness, as well as cultural diversity issues within domestic and global contexts will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): PY 101, MS 205
  
  •  

    HS 350 - Global Health Perspectives

    (3)
    This course is an interdisciplinary course focusing on international perspectives on health-related issues in rural, urban, and suburban communities in locations outside the U.S. Topics included: exploration of global health problems, theory, research and practice in international health, community assessment and cross-cultural issues in international settings. The course is designed in a seminar/field experience format where students participate in classroom (U.S. and internationally) and experiential activities within international communities. Students will complete needs assessments, applied health-related research, and interventions for communities in international venues as appropriate. Can be repeated for credit with a change in venue. Prerequisite(s): PY 101 or SY 101
  
  •  

    HS 351 - Introduction to Epidemiology

    (3)
    This course will introduce the student to applied epidemiology and epidemiology as a research methodology. Applied epidemiology includes population based approaches to disease prevention and control as well as epidemiological concepts and processes relative to international health, wellness, and disease. Measurement and examination of incidence, prevalence, risk, morbidity, mortality rates and ratios will be emphasized. Epidemiological research methods will include a description of study designs used to study health and disease in human populations including randomized trials and four types of observational studies (cohort, case-control, cross-sectional and ecological.
  
  •  

    HS 360 - Fundamentals of Pharmacology

    (3)
    This introductory course in Pharmacology will attempt to provide information to the healthcare student, regarding the clinical application of pharmacology. Study will include appropriate information regarding the safe use of drugs, side effects, drug interactions and drug therapy for common acute and chronic diseases. Prerequisite(s): BY 112, BY 209, BY 210, CY 202
  
  •  

    HS 401 - Clinical Immunology w/ Lab

    (3)
    Basic principles and types of immunity. Consideration of transplantation, AIDS, hypersensitivity, and tumor immunology of the human. Laboratory methods of serodiagnosis of disease and blood and tissue typing are emphasized. Prerequisite(s): BY 112, BY 206
  
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    HS 410 - Clinical Human Anatomy

    (3)
    This course is an in-depth study of the structure of the human body, with an emphasis on the functional anatomy of the musculoskeletal and neuromuscular systems. Directed laboratory experiences will include cadaver dissection, student presentations, use of models and anatomical specimens, clinical case presentations, and computer simulations. Prerequisite(s): BY 209 or 210
  
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    HS 410L - Clinical Human Anatomy Lab

    (1)
    See course description for   
  
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    HS 413 - Clinical Human Anatomy: Cavities and Systems

    (3)
    This is an in-depth study of the structure of the human body with emphasis on functional anatomy of the thorax, abdomen, and pelvic cavity. Directed laboratory experiences including cadaver dissection, student presentations, use of models, anatomical specimens, clinical case presentations and computer simulations support the analysis and integration of human structure and function. Note(s) One hour lecture and two laboratory hours per week.
  
  •  

    HS 413L - Clinical Human Anatomy Lab: Cavities and Systems

    (1)
    Lab associated with BY 413.
  
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    HS 425 - Program Planning

    (3)
    Students will learn appropriate skills necessary for planning, implementing, and evaluating health promotion programs for a specific priority population. Prerequisite(s): MS 205
  
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    HS 490 - PrePA Clinical Clerkship

    (1)
    Students are required to increase their shadowing experience with a PA, physician, or NP for a minimum of 200 hours during their Pre-Professional training. Prerequisite(s): PNBY 100, PNBY 300
  
  •  

    HS 499 - Senior PrePA Seminar

    (3)
    This course examines the importance of interviewing. Communication skills, verbal and nonverbal, are addressed. Students will learn and practice the patient interview as well as the professional interview. Medical ethics will also be addressed. Prerequisite(s): PNBY 100, EH 103, PNBY 300
  
  •  

    HS 550 - Global Health Perspectives

    (3)
    This course is an interdisciplinary course focusing on international perspectives on health with regard to healthcare, health practices, and systems issues affecting health in rural, urban, and suburban communities in locations outside the U.S. The course is designed in a seminar/field experience format where students participate in classroom (U.S. and internationally) and experiential activities within international communities. Students will complete needs assessments, applied health-related research, and interventions for communities in international venues. Strong emphasis on understanding health issues related to specific international communities and on establishing partnerships for studying international health. Can be repeated for credit with a change in venue.
  
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    HS 771 - Advanced Pathophysiology

    (3)
    This course provides advanced content in pathophysiology. Alternations in physiology at the cellular, organ, and system level are discussed and selected pathophysiologic mechanisms that occur throughout the life cycle are explored.
  
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    HS 799 - Health Services Career Capstone

    (3)
    This course is designed to expose students to the wide range of career options available with the Health Services program. This capstone course will involve either fieldwork or a major project that demonstrates an application and integration of all previous coursework. Students will work with their adviser to ascertain whether the fieldwork experience or the project best suits their particular discipline. Each experience is tailored to meet the individual student’s needs and interests.
  
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    HS 901 - Biostatistics

    (3)
    This course applies basic statistics to biomedical problems in the health science fields. Emphasis is on methods of design and analysis for interpreting epidemiological studies. Students will utilize Microsoft Excel spread sheets and statistical software to analyze and interpret data generated from biomedical problems.
  
  •  

    HS 902 - Epidemiology

    (3)
    This course focuses on the basic elements of epidemiology which utilizes quantitative methods to describe disease etiology and patterns of transmission. Methods will consider the prevalence, incidence, and frequency of illness and disease and the knowledge impact on disease prevention and mortality among various populations and groups.

History

  
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    HY 201 - History of the United States I *

    (3)
    A survey of U.S. History from prerevolutionary origins through the Civil War.
  
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    HY 202 - History of the United States II *

    (3)
    A survey of U.S. History from the Civil War to the present.
  
  •  

    HY 205 - Women in US History I

    (3)
    This course surveys the role of women in the historical development of the United States from the moment of contact to the Civil War, examining a range of topics, including contact and colonization, institution building, and education. Emphasis will be placed on women’s pursuit of political, social, and economic equality.
  
  •  

    HY 205W - Women in U.S. History I *

    (3)
    This course surveys the role of women in the historical development of the United States from the moment of contact to the Civil War, examining a range of topics, including contact and colonization, institution building, and education. Emphasis will be placed on women’s pursuit of political, social, and economic equality.  This course is designated as a “W” course. W courses emphasize the experience and expertise of women throughout course design and delivery. Students will identify and analyze the contributions and experiences of women. More than 50% of course activities, readings, and assessments emphasize and explore female experience, perspective, or expertise.
  
  •  

    HY 206 - Women in US History II

    (3)
    This course surveys the role of women in the historical development of the United States from the Civil War to the present, examining a range of topics, including immigration, suffrage, and the second wave of feminism. Emphasis will be placed on women’s pursuit of political, social, and economic equality.
  
  •  

    HY 206W - Women in U.S. History II *

    (3)
    This course surveys the role of women in the historical development of the United States from the Civil War to the present, examining a range of topics, including immigration, suffrage, and the second wave of feminism. Emphasis will be placed on women’s pursuit of political, social, and economic equality.  This course is designated as a “W” course. W courses emphasize the experience and expertise of women throughout course design and delivery. Students will identify and analyze the contributions and experiences of women. More than 50% of course activities, readings, and assessments emphasize and explore female experience, perspective, or expertise.
  
  •  

    HY 210 - World Civilization I *

    (3)
    This course focuses on describing the history of humankind from the preliterate period to the Protestant and Catholic Reformations. Included are the rise of civilizations and empires; special attention is directed to the civilizations of Egypt, Mesopotamia, Persia, the Hebrews, Greece, Rome, Byzantium, the Muslim World, the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Emphasis is placed on the chronological development of social, political and economic institutions, as well as the cumulative contributions of various civilizations to our culture.
  
  •  

    HY 211 - World Civilization II *

    (3)
    A continuation of the first course with special attention being devoted to economic and political revolutions and the study of war as a historical phenomenon. The course will focus on the commercial revolution; the industrial revolution; the political revolutions of America, France and Russia; World War I; World War II; the Cold War; and the Vietnam era.
  
  •  

    HY 240 - Crises in Modern History *

    (3)
    The goal of this course is to combine the investigation of special cases in history with reflections on global issues. It explores the causes and consequences of historically significant events that have shaped the modern world. Topics include wars and revolutions. Can be taken for credit with a change in emphasis.
  
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    HY 322 - Genocides in History

    (3)
    This course is an introduction to the historical study of the Holocaust and other genocides. In addition to the Holocaust, topics include other cases, such as the Armenian genocide, ethnic cleansing in the former Yugoslavia, and Rwanda. Studies about the Holocaust and other genocides address questions such as: What is tolerance? What leads societies to conduct acts of mass murder? What can be done to prevent atrocities in the future?
  
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    HY 390 - Special Topics in History

    (1 to 3)
    Topics of special interest in history. Note(s) Departmental Approval Required.
  
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    HY 401 - Directed Independent Study

    (3)
    Designed to provide the student with an opportunity to work intensively on an individual project with the supervision of a faculty member. Note(s) Departmental Approval Required.

History/Political Science

  
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    HYPO 307 - Women & Minorities in Contemporary History & Politics *

    (3)
    This is a survey course exploring minority rights, women’s issues, and related problems in different countries.
  
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    HYPO 307W - Women & Minorities in Contemporary History & Politics *

    (3)
    This is a survey course exploring minority rights, women’s issues, and related problems in different countries.  This course is designated as a “W” course. W courses emphasize the experience and expertise of women throughout course design and delivery. Students will identify and analyze the contributions and experiences of women. More than 50% of course activities, readings, and assessments emphasize and explore female experience, perspective, or expertise.
  
  •  

    HYPO 330 - Film in History and Politics

    (3)
    A study of how history and politics are presented in contemporary and classical films. The students will examine how films in a given time period support, distort, or seek to change the prevailing social, political, and economic circumstances examined in the film.
  
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    HYPO 380 - Area Studies

    (3)
    This is a survey course exploring social, cultural, historical and political developments in regions such as Western Europe, Great Britain, Central/Eastern Europe, Latin American, China, and the Middle East. Note(s) May be repeated for credit with a change in course emphasis.
  
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    HYPO 450 - Senior Thesis

    (3)
    This course offers a capstone experience for those intending graduate study or for those interested in conducting research. Regularly scheduled meetings with the instructor will ensure familiarity with the research and writing processes. An oral defense of the thesis will ensure familiarity with the defense process. Prerequisites: Senior class standing and permission of the department.
  
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    HYPO 480 - Field Experience-Internship

    (3)
    Participation in practical experience programs such as the Governor’s Intern Program and the Georgia Legislative Internship. Note(s) Departmental Approval Required.

Honors

  
  •  

    HN 210 - Honors Seminar: Communication & Language Fluency *

    (3)
    This course, held in a seminar setting, employs creative pedagogies to help students cultivate proficiency in public speaking and provides them opportunities to practice and develop communication skills. This course satisfies the LE Communication and Language Fluency Portal at the Honors level.
  
  •  

    HN 210W - Honors Seminar: Communication & Language Fluency *

    (3)
    This course, held in a seminar setting, employs creative pedagogies to help students cultivate proficiency in public speaking and provides them opportunities to practice and develop communication skills. This course satisfies the LE Communication and Language Fluency Portal at the Honors level.  This course is designated as a “W” course. W courses emphasize the experience and expertise of women throughout course design and delivery. Students will identify and analyze the contributions and experiences of women. More than 50% of course activities, readings, and assessments emphasize and explore female experience, perspective, or expertise.
  
  •  

    HN 220 - Honors Seminar: World Understanding *

    (3)
    This course, held in a seminar setting, offers students tools to identify ideological frameworks that shape government, society, and citizen interactions in the so-called civilized and uncivilized worlds. Students will also learn to build civic skills by participating in various forms of volunteering, campaigning, and community-organizing. This course satisfies the LE World Understanding Portal at the Honors Level.
  
  •  

    HN 220W - Honors Seminar: World Understanding *

    (3)
    This course, held in a seminar setting, offers students tools to identify ideological frameworks that shape government, society, and citizen interactions in the so-called civilized and uncivilized worlds. Students will also learn to build civic skills by participating in various forms of volunteering, campaigning, and community-organizing. This course satisfies the LE World Understanding Portal at the Honors Level.  This course is designated as a “W” course. W courses emphasize the experience and expertise of women throughout course design and delivery. Students will identify and analyze the contributions and experiences of women. More than 50% of course activities, readings, and assessments emphasize and explore female experience, perspective, or expertise.
  
  •  

    HN 230 - Honors Seminar: Artistic and Creative Imagination *

    (3)
    This course, held in a seminar setting, is designed to give students a theoretical and practical venue for creative and/or artistic projects. Such venues may include art, writing, theatre, radio, dance, or sculpture. This course satisfies the LE World Artistic and Creative Imagination Portal at the Honors Level.
  
  •  

    HN 230W - Honors Seminar: Artistic & Creative Imagination *

    (3)
    This course, held in a seminar setting, is designed to give students a theoretical and practical venue for creative and/or artistic projects. Such venues may include art, writing, theatre, radio, dance, or sculpture. This course satisfies the LE World Artistic and Creative Imagination Portal at the Honors Level. This course is designated as a “W” course. W courses emphasize the experience and expertise of women throughout course design and delivery. Students will identify and analyze the contributions and experiences of women. More than 50% of course activities, readings, and assessments emphasize and explore female experience, perspective, or expertise.
  
  •  

    HN 240 - Honors Seminar: Scientific and Analytic Curiosity *

    (3)
    This course, held in a seminar setting, develops critical thinking and reasoning skills through the examination of issues of science, health, and medicine. This course satisfies the LE Scientific and Analytic Curiosity Portal at the Honors Level.
  
  •  

    HN 240W - Honors Seminar: Scientific & Analytic Curiosity *

    (3)
    This course, held in a seminar setting, develops critical thinking and reasoning skills through the examination of issues of science, health, and medicine. This course satisfies the LE Scientific and Analytic Curiosity Portal at the Honors Level.  This course is designated as a “W” course. W courses emphasize the experience and expertise of women throughout course design and delivery. Students will identify and analyze the contributions and experiences of women. More than 50% of course activities, readings, and assessments emphasize and explore female experience, perspective, or expertise.
  
  •  

    HN 250 - Honors Research and Travel *

    (3)
    HN 250 allows students participating in a Brenau travel experience to deepen their familiarity with the culture and history of their destination through a semester-long research course. The course may be taught as an independent study by a professor affiliated with the study abroad experience. Students will conduct focused research under the guidance of their professor and will identify issues of history, culture, race, class, or gender in their proposed destination. Students will produce a final project demonstrating the results of their research, write a series of reflective essays connecting the study abroad experience to their research, and present their findings to their professor and a member of the Honors Committee.
  
  •  

    HN 250W - Honors Research/Travel *

    (3)
    HN 250 allows students participating in a Brenau travel experience to deepen their familiarity with the culture and history of their destination through a semester-long research course. The course may be taught as an independent study by a professor affiliated with the study abroad experience. Students will conduct focused research under the guidance of their professor and will identify issues of history, culture, race, class, or gender in their proposed destination. Students will produce a final project demonstrating the results of their research, write a series of reflective essays connecting the study abroad experience to their research, and present their findings to their professor and a member of the Honors Committee. This course is designated as a “W” course. W courses emphasize the experience and expertise of women throughout course design and delivery. Students will identify and analyze the contributions and experiences of women. More than 50% of course activities, readings, and assessments emphasize and explore female experience, perspective, or expertise.
  
  •  

    HN 260 - Honors Augmentation

    (1)
    In order to create extraordinary lives, the Honors Augmentation gives students access to an individual space for learning. Students work in a collaborative way with a professor to augment an existing non-honors course by pursuing one of three tracks: scholarship, professional development, or a service project. Through this course, honors students show initiative and take ownership for their learning. Note(s) Students may take HN 260 up to two times with a change in emphasis.
  
  •  

    HN 260W - Honors Augmentation

    (1)
    In order to create extraordinary lives, the Honors Augmentation gives student access to an individual space for learning. Students work in a collaborative way with a professor to augment an existing non-honors course by pursuing one of three tracks: scholarship, professional development, or a service project. Through this course, honors students show initiative and take ownership for their learning. Students may take HN 260 up to two times with a change in emphasis. This course is designated as a “W” course. W courses emphasize the experience and expertise of women throughout course design and delivery. Students will identify and analyze the contributions and experiences of women. More than 50% of course activities, readings, and assessments emphasize and explore female experience, perspective, or expertise. Note(s) May take up to 2 times.
  
  •  

    HN 499 - Senior Honors Capstone

    (1-3)
    This course, linked to and grounded by a student’s major capstone course, offers a student a chance to prepare for careers or graduate study by participating in professional development activities.
  
  •  

    HN 499W - Senior Honors Capstone

    (3)
    This course is linked to and grounded by a student’s major capstone course, offers a student a chance to prepare for careers or graduate study by participating in professional development activities.  This course is designated as a “W” course. W courses emphasize the experience and expertise of women throughout course design and delivery. Students will identify and analyze the contributions and experiences of women. More than 50% of course activities, readings, and assessments emphasize and explore female experience, perspective, or expertise.

Human Resources

  
  •  

    HR 301 - Research Methods in Organizations

    (3)
    Learners master the research methods and designs used in organizations and organizational research. Prerequisite(s): HR 333
  
  •  

    HR 312 - Recruiting and Selection

    (3)
    Learners examine the methods and techniques of recruiting and selecting personnel that will allow the organization to function in a competitive environment, and incorporate the principles and practices of interviewing into their skill set. Prerequisite(s): HR 333
  
  •  

    HR 331 - Labor Management Relations

    (3)
    Students examine the historical development and current status of collective bargaining; the roles of the three actors (labor, management, and government) in the practice of collective bargaining; and the impact of recent institutional, legislative, and economic developments on labor-management relations. Prerequisite(s): HR 333
  
  •  

    HR 333 - Human Resource Management

    (3)
    Students explore the principles and practices of human resource management, including the functional areas of HR: planning, recruitment, and selection; development (e.g., orientation, training, team building, performance appraisal systems, organizational development, career development); compensation and benefits; safety and health; employee and labor relations; and human resource research.
  
  •  

    HR 333W - Human Resource Management

    (3)
    Students explore the principles and practices of human resource management, including the functional areas of HR: planning, recruitment, and selection; development (e.g., orientation, training, team building, performance appraisal systems, organizational development, career development); compensation and benefits; safety and health; employee and labor relations; and human resource research.  This course is designated as a “W” course. W courses emphasize the experience and expertise of women throughout course design and delivery. Students will identify and analyze the contributions and experiences of women. More than 50% of course activities, readings, and assessments emphasize and explore female experience, perspective, or expertise.
  
  •  

    HR 401 - Benefits and Compensation

    (3)
    Students explore the methods and techniques used to develop a compensation plan that will allow an organization to be competitive with its target group. They also examine the effect of government regulations on plans and how the compensation package affects strategic placement. Prerequisite(s): HR 333
  
  •  

    HR 414 - Designing Training Programs

    (3)
    This course explores the training methods appropriate for adult learners; examines the goals and objectives of training programs; examines sequencing instruction to match the order in which objectives will be met; reviews methods and materials applicable to adult learners; and explores the planning, selection, and development of techniques to evaluate learning performance and instruction. Prerequisite(s): HR 333
  
  •  

    HR 422 - HR Strategic Planning

    (3)
    Learners apply strategic business planning principles to the human resources function and develop the tools that HR Managers and all employees need to learn to anticipate rapid changes in their jobs, careers, work groups, and organizations. Learners explore the need to be guided by a comprehensive, unified plan. Prerequisite(s): HR 312, HR 333, HR 401
  
  •  

    HR 428 - Measurement of Human Resource Management

    (3)
    This course provides an overview of the measurement of the major duties and financial management of the Human Resource Management function. This includes the measurement and quantifications of staffing efforts, compensation and benefits, training, employee relations, and intellectual capital. It also includes HR budget development and management. Prerequisite(s): HR 312, HR 333
  
  •  

    HR 486 - HRM Applied Project

    (3)
    In this supervised, specialized applied research project for advanced HRM majors, learners investigate problems in the work environment requiring the student to use approved scientific methodology. This is the capstone course in the HRM curriculum. This project allows learners to use the skills and knowledge from their previous courses in analyzing and contributing to the host organization and gain further experience. The choice of one of two options (Field Experience or Applied Project) will depend upon the learner’s professional development needs, access to data, and professional experience. The option is to be approved by the instructor. Prerequisite(s): HR 301, HR 312, HR 333, HR 401, HR 414, HR 422
  
  •  

    HR 737 - Employment Law

    (3)
    Students examine employment law from several different perspectives: the employment-at-will doctrine; the rights of individual workers, e.g., employees and independent contractors; equal employment opportunity laws; the Constitution’s role in today’s workplace; privacy rights in the workplace; compensation laws; occupational illnesses and injuries; substance abuse screening/testing; and collective bargaining law. Prerequisite(s): MG 733
  
  •  

    HR 750 - Talent Acquisition & Management

    (3)
    This course explores acquisition and management of critical human talent as a core business function to achieve competitive advantage in domestic and global environments.  This involves talent recruiting, high-potential planning, retention, performance management, and knowledge management to improve organizational performance. Web-based technologies are introduced to execute these processes. Prerequisite(s): MG 733
  
  •  

    HR 760 - HRM total Rewards

    (3)
    The learner will examine the total rewards strategy of combining compensation, benefits, work life, and recognition for performance and career development into a tailored function. The purpose of such design is to engage employees and achieve competitive advantage and desired business results. Prerequisite(s): MG 733 or HC 770
  
  •  

    HR 785 - Human Resource Strategy

    (3)
    The learner will examine the process of embedding HR systems within the firm’s overall strategy and leveraging these systems to impact business operations for sustainable advantage. This includes transforming the HR function from a transactional to a strategic focus, clarifying and measuring HR as a strategic influence, creating, executing, and measuring HR alignment. Prerequisite(s): MG 733, HR 737, HR 750, HR 760

Interior Design

  
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    ID 200 - Practicum

    (1 to 6)
    Provides the student with the opportunity to engage in selected projects in areas of special interest or to those students who need experience in the field of merchandising. Note(s) May be repeated.
  
  •  

    ID 233 - Computer Aided Drafting & Design

    (3)
    Students will be introduced to basic computer drafting skills. Students draft a set of construction documents using CADD. Students must possess a basic understanding of computer file maintenance skills.
  
  •  

    ID 240 - Textiles for Interior Design

    (3)
    The course introduces the student to textiles for interior design including fiber properties, manufacture of yarns, fabric identification, fabrication methods, finishes and end-use application for different types of interiors. Students will learn testing procedures, performance classification, safety issues, and related fire codes.
  
  •  

    ID 275 - Interior Design - Process *

    (3)
    This course is designed to assist students in understanding the scope of Interior Design. Students will be introduced to the interior design process, design skills, human space requirements and behavior, and design theories.
  
  •  

    ID 275W - Interior Design - Process *

    (3)
    This course is designed to assist students in understanding the scope of Interior Design. Students will be introduced to the interior design process, design skills, human space requirements and behavior, and design theories. This course is designated as a “W” course. W courses emphasize the experience and expertise of women throughout course design and delivery. Students will identify and analyze the contributions and experiences of women. More than 50% of course activities, readings, and assessments emphasize and explore female experience, perspective, or expertise.
  
  •  

    ID 285 - Architectural Drafting

    (4)
    Students develop drafting and hand sketching skills, completing a set of construction documents which are hand drafted.
  
  •  

    ID 290 - Design I

    (4)
    This course explores the basic elements and principles that arrange form and space. Students will use traditional and/or digital tools to help them visualize their designs volumetrically and apply 2D and 3D design elements to the spatial envelope. Prerequisite(s): ID 285
  
  •  

    ID 295 - Built Environment Graphics

    (3)
    Students study 3D graphics, including isometrics and axonometrics. They additionally develop one and two-point perspectives and related shade and shadow techniques. Students then render perspectives in a variety of mediums. Students study various methods in developing presentations, including computer graphic techniques. Prerequisite(s): Recommended Prerequisite ID 285/285/L
  
  •  

    ID 305 - Space Planning

    (4)
    This course builds on concepts and theories introduced in ID 275 and guides students through the complexities of the space planning process addressing both function and aesthetics. Students will complete a series of assignments increasing in size and difficulty designed to develop space planning skills. Prerequisite(s): ID 275, ID 285
  
  •  

    ID 308 - History of Interiors and Architecture I *

    (3)
    This is a survey of the history of decorative arts of western civilization concentrating on architecture, interior design and furniture through the mid 1800s. Included in this course are Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Gothic, Italian, Spanish, French, English and the early American Periods. Other civilizations including Eastern and Pre-Columbian cultures are also addressed.
  
  •  

    ID 309 - History of Interiors and Architecture II *

    (3)
    This course traces the development of 19th and 20th century furniture, interiors and architecture from industrialization to the present and examines the theoretical basis for the evolution of contemporary design.  Discussion includes the history of the profession of interior design, socio-political influences in modern society, material logic in construction and the stylistic contributions of individual designers and architects.
  
  •  

    ID 309W - History of Interiors and Architecture II *

    (3)
    This course traces the development of 19th and 20th century furniture, interiors and architecture from industrialization to the present and examines the theoretical basis for the evolution of contemporary design.  Discussion includes the history of the profession of interior design, socio-political influences in modern society, material logic in construction and the stylistic contributions of individual designers and architects.  This course is designated as a W course. W courses emphasize the experience and expertise of women throughout course design and delivery. Students will identify and analyze the contributions and experiences of women. More than 50% of course activities, readings, and assessments emphasize and explore female experience, perspective, or expertise.
  
  •  

    ID 312 - Materials in the Built Environment

    (3)
    Study of materials used in the built environment with emphasis on the interior. Students develop knowledge of material characteristic, selection, application, installation methods, and industry regulations.
  
  •  

    ID 331 - Interior Lighting

    (3)
    This course studies the interior aspects of lighting design and application. Emphasis is placed on lighting in the human environment and its effects on the occupants. Students will complete lighting level calculations, select lighting fixtures, lamps, and produce specifications. Prerequisite(s): ID 285 or ID 233 Note(s) Must have completed all Section I courses.
  
  •  

    ID 332 - Detailing in the Built Environment

    (3)


    This course will study methods and materials for interior construction. Students will create details and specify materials for interior components, including walls, floors, ceilings, glazing, millwork and cabinetry.

      Prerequisite(s): ID 285, ID 233 or ID 333 Note(s) Must have completed all Section I courses.

  
  •  

    ID 333 - Building Information Modeling

    (3)
    Introduces Building Information Modeling (BIM) software for 3D modeling interior design. Prerequisite(s): ID 285 or ID 233
  
  •  

    ID 334 - Building Systems

    (2)
    This course reviews the building constructions systems and their relationship to the interior environment. Specific topics include plumbing, thermal, HVAC, electrical, communications, security and acoustics.
  
  •  

    ID 335 - Building Codes, Regulations and Systems

    (3)
    This course works to develop a student’s understanding of regulations, codes, and building systems for built environments specific to their implications on interiors. Students will study and apply codes relating to health, safety, and the welfare of the public and apply ADA regulations. Students will understand the components of wall, floor, and ceiling assemblies, mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems and their relationship to the overall study of interior design. Prerequisite(s): ID 275, ID 285
 

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